WILD ABOUT WILD GARLIC!

Vampires hate it – I love it and eagerly await the scent of it at the beginning of spring, then to top it all, the flowers!

YOU WILL DETECT THE SCENT – YOU KNOW ITS THERE EVEN BEFORE YOU CAST YOUR EYES ON IT.

This plant is a truly idyllic culinary treat – a wild ingredient that, when in season, grows in abundance, nestled among bluebells, attracted by the moist soil and shady woodland environment. Wild garlic has enjoyed a culinary boom in recent times, taking its place alongside rhubarb and asparagus as a pillar of spring’s bounty. It has a short season, usually first appearing in mid-March and lasting until early May.

This season, specimen location highlights have been in the foreground at St Ann’s well, Malvern and in its swathes, banks and banks of this wonderful plant at the Knapp Papermill nature reserve at Alfrick Pound.

Provided you know what you are picking, why not try making wild garlic butter? there are some fabulous recipes to be found on-line.

Here’s a rather good Poem by Sean Hewitt on wild garlic:-

Wild Garlic

Out in the copse after rain

(too late after dark to be here).

Warm soil, woodlice dripping

from the underside of leaves –

I root down to the tender stalks

and twist them free – soaked petals

dip and touch my arm, kernels 

of bud, itch of foliage, of wildness

on my skin. The wood is carrying

the smell, earth-rich, too heavy 

to lift above head-height, and my boots 

and jeans are bleached with it. 

I turn home, and all across the floor

the spiked white flowers 

light the way. The world is dark 

but the wood is full of stars.

I only wish my pictures also incorprated smello-vision!

Prints available in various sizes upon request…

This plant is a truly idyllic culinary treat – a wild ingredient that, when in season, grows in abundance, nestled among bluebells, attracted by the moist soil and shady woodland environment. Wild garlic has enjoyed a culinary boom in recent times, taking its place alongside rhubarb and asparagus as a pillar of spring’s bounty. It has a short season, usually first appearing in mid-March and lasting until early May.

This season, specimen location highlights have been in the foreground at St Ann’s well, Malvern and in its swathes, banks and banks of this wonderful plant at the Knapp Papermill nature reserve at Alfrick Pound.

Provided you know what you are picking, why not try making wild garlic butter? there are some fabulous recipes to be found on-line.

Here’s a rather good Poem by Sean Hewitt on wild garlic:-

Wild Garlic

Out in the copse after rain

(too late after dark to be here).

Warm soil, woodlice dripping

from the underside of leaves –

I root down to the tender stalks

and twist them free – soaked petals

dip and touch my arm, kernels 

of bud, itch of foliage, of wildness

on my skin. The wood is carrying

the smell, earth-rich, too heavy 

to lift above head-height, and my boots 

and jeans are bleached with it. 

I turn home, and all across the floor

the spiked white flowers 

light the way. The world is dark 

but the wood is full of stars.

I only wish my pictures also incorprated smello-vision!

Prints available in various sizes upon request…